Project 365 – Day 220: The Canadian Centre for Architecture

August 07 2012

Although the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) is closed on Monday’s and Tuesday’s I’ve never actually visited the sculpture garden that is on the south side of René Lévesque which is always open to the public.

The CCA website describes the garden as follows:

“The garden was designed by Montréal artist-architect Melvin Charney as part of the Québec government’s competition program for the integration of art and architecture, combining sculpture and public space on a site granted to the CCA by the City of Montréal in 1986. At once a garden in the city and a museum in the open air, it evokes the history of landscape design and comments on Montréal’s early industrial sector below the hill, initiating a dialogue between nature, architecture, and the urban fabric. The garden is laid out as a series of narrative episodes – Orchard, Meadow, Arcade (mirror of the Shaughnessy House), Esplanade, Belvedere, and Allegorical Columns. Collectively they speak of the history of architecture and the history of the city.”

The Canadian Centre for Architecture Sculpture Garden

The Canadian Centre for Architecture Sculpture Garden
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The Canadian Centre for Architecture Sculpture Garden

The Canadian Centre for Architecture Sculpture Garden
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The Canadian Centre for Architecture Sculpture Garden

The Canadian Centre for Architecture Sculpture Garden
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The CCA is an international research centre and museum that was founded by the Canadian philanthropist and architect Phyllis Lambert in 1979.

Construction of the CCA was completed in 1989 and incorporates the Shaughnessy House mansion, built for Thomas Shaughnessy, that Lambert purchased in 1974 to prevent its demolition.

The 130,000-square-foot new building houses exhibition galleries, theatre, bookstore, library, study centre, state-of-the-art conservation and collection facilities. The CCA has has received numerous design awards in North America and Europe.

The CCA holds one of the world’s greatest international research collections comprising 100,000 prints and drawings, more than 60,000 photographs, 150 archives, 215,000 volumes, and over 5,000 periodical titles. A large portion of the collection was donated by Lambert that she had acquired over 50 years.

The Canadian Centre for Architecture

The Canadian Centre for Architecture
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The Canadian Centre for Architecture

The Canadian Centre for Architecture
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The Canadian Centre for Architecture

The Canadian Centre for Architecture
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The Canadian Centre for Architecture

The Canadian Centre for Architecture
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The Canadian Centre for Architecture

The Canadian Centre for Architecture
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The Canadian Centre for Architecture

The Canadian Centre for Architecture
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I would have photographed the front of the building – adjacent to René Lévesque – but unfortunately they were doing some maintenance work and so will have to return another day – preferably at night when it’s lit up.

Admission is 10$ for adults (free for students and children) but good to know if you plan on visiting is that on Thursday’s after 5.30 admission is free (closes at 9).

To view images in gallery format, simply click on one of the images below.

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Thanks for stopping by. Until next time.

- Martin

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